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Tag: Ronald Reagan

Hinckley Not Dangerous and Should be Released, Lawyer Says

Herman Cain Asked for Secret Service Protection, Washington Post Reports

Cain with his wife Gloria/ cain campaign photo

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

We’re getting a little more insight as to why presidential candidate Herman Cain was granted Secret Service protection — the first candidate to get protection in this campaign season.

Apparently Cain asked for it, and Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano and congressional leaders approved it Thursday,  reports the Washington Post.

The Secret Service has requested $113.4 million to guard the Republican primary winner in the general election — $4 million more than in 2008 and about two-thirds more than 2004.

The Secret Service has a long history of protecting those seeking the highest office in the land.

Barack Obama was the earliest candidate to receive Secret Service protection when agents began tailing the then-senator eight months before the first primary contest, in May 2007.

Campaign trail security began in 1968 with Congressional authorization to protect major presidential candidates after Robert F. Kennedy’s assassination in California.

While Obama received protection earliest, having agents at his side for 629 days. But Ronald Reagan holds the record for the most “protection days:” Over the course of three campaigns, the Secret Service protected Reagan for 791 days.

To read more click here.

Ex-Miss. U.S. Attorney H.M. Ray Who Served 20 Years Dies at Age 86

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Former Mississippi U.S. Attorney H.M. Ray, whose 20- year reign included the 1960s civil rights era, and who served under five presidents, died at age 86, the Memphis Commercial Appeal reported.

Ray was appointed by President Kennedy to the Jackson, Miss. office, and resigned right after Ronald Reagan became president in 1981.

“We were very close. He was a great boss,” former assistant U.S. attorney John Hailman of Oxford, Miss. told the Commercial Appeal.  “Mainly, he insisted that we do the right thing. He was very courageous about taking unpopular stances, and he always backed us up.”

Some of his higher profile cases included the prosecution of  four men linked to the shooting deaths of two people during rioting over the entrance of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi in 1962, the paper reported. The men were not convicted.

Ray also served in the state House from 1948 to 1951. After resigning as U.S. Attorney,  he went off to  practice law with the Wise, Carter, Child & Caraway firm in Jackson. He then went to work for then-state Atty. Gen. Mike Moore, the Commercial Appeal reported.

“He was quite a mentor for me, and I learned a lot from him. He was a great lawyer and an even better person,”  Moore told the paper.

John Hinckley to Get More Visits to Mom’s House

John Hinckley Jr. -abc news photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — John Hinckley, who shot President Reagan outside a Washington hotel in 1981, will be getting more visits to his mother’s house in Virginia, the Associated Press reported.

U.S. District Judge Paul Friedman on Wednesday approved an unspecified number of extra visits for Hinckley, who is housed at St. Elizabeths Hospital, a psychiatric institution in a tough part of Southeast Washington.

AP reported that the hospital will file a plan by June for additional releases. U.S. Attorney spokesman Bill Miller told AP that the judge will detail the visits in a future court order.

John Hinckley Wants More Unsupervised Visits to Mother’s Va. Home

John Hinckley Jr. -abc news photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — John Hinckley Jr., the Jodie Foster-obsessed gunman who shot President Reagan in 1981, wants more unsupervised visits to his mother’s home in Virginia, according to a court filing on Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Washington.

The court papers filed by attorney Barry Levine asks a federal judge to grant the  55-year-old more unsupervised visits. The papers noted that Hinckley had been granted 12 unsupervised visits, but used them all up. Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity. The filing was first reported by the Associated Press.

“This Court’s July 20, 2009 Order granted Mr. Hinckley a total of twelve (12) visits to his mother’s home for a duration of nine nights,” attorney Levine wrote. “Mr. Hinckley has recently completed his twelfth visit, and therefore is unable to continue progressing with the therapeutic and transitional goals of the visits unless and until there is further relief form this Court.”

“Like his prior conditional release visits, each and every one of Mr. Hinckley’s twelve visits under the July 20, 2009 Court Order were completed in full and faithful compliance with the Court’s order, without any manifestation of mental disease or danger to himself or others, as has been reported to this Court.”

“Consequently, the Hospital is preparing a petition to this Court to request that Mr. Hinckley be given additional time in the area of his mother’s home toward the goal of fully transitioning Mr. Hinckley there.

“During the pendency of the preparation of the petition, Mr. Hinckley and the Hospital respectfully request that this Court enter an Order granting him interim relief of additional visits until such time as the Court enters a new order in order for Mr. Hinckley to maintain his therapeutic and transitional goals.”

Read Court Filing

Wise-Cracking Mike Stenger of U.S. Secret Service Hanging it Up

Stenger overshadowed by a more youthful look/ticklethewire.com

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — Mike Stenger, the wise-cracking, New Jersey bred, 35-year veteran of the U.S. Secret Service whose protective details included President Reagan, Jesse Jackson and Egypt President Anwar Sadat, is hanging up his badge and gun. Friday is his last day.

At a retirement party Thursday at Secret Service headquarters in downtown Washington, Stenger, the assistant director of government and public affairs, delivered a vintage Stenger speech sprinkled with jokes and wise cracks  and shout outs to the many folks he worked with over the years.

Secret Service Dir. Keith Prewitt

Secret Service Dep. Director Kevin Prewitt with Stenger

Secret Service Dir. Mark Sullivan with Stenger

A number of people spoke  including  Secret Service director Mark Sullivan, deputy director Keith Prewitt and Thomas  Harrigan, assistant administrator, chief of operations for DEA.   Agency representatives from the Justice Department, Interpol and Royal Mounted Canadian Police also gave presentations, and his family, including his wife of 38 years, was on hand.

DEA's Harrigan with Stenger

One of the more surprising moments came when a recording was played to the crowd. It was the voice of   Tony Sirico who played “Paulie Walnuts” in the Sopranos. He’s a friend of Stengers.

“I love you, you’re the best,” Sirico said. “They’re losing a good one. You’re top shelf.” Then he signed off with a “badda bing.”

Stenger is going up to Capitol Hill to become assistant Sergeant of Arms for Intelligence and Protective Services for the U.S. Senate. He held a number of posts over the years including special agent in charge of the Washington Field Office.

Secret Service Agents Say Pres. Reagan Was Sharp During Presidency Contrary to What Son Says

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Ronald Kessler of Newmax.com writes that Secret Service agents on President Reagan’s detail say the 40th president “was sharp until several years after he left the presidency”, contrary to what son Ron wrote in his latest book.

“We had a hundred twenty agents on his detail, and he seemed to remember everyone’s name,” former agent Glenn Smith said of Reagan when he was in the White House, according to Kessler. Kessler authored the book “In the President’s Secret Service: Behind the Scenes with Agents in the Line of Fire and the Presidents They Protect.”

The President’s son Ron Reagan claims in his just-released book “My Father at 100” that his father showed signs of Alzheimer’s Disease in his second term.

To read more click here.

Retired Secret Service Agent John Joseph Lardner Who Protected the Kennedys Dead at Age 80; Always Kept Mum About Detail

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Retired Secret Service agent John Joseph Lardner rode behind President John F. Kennedy on Pennsylvania Avenue during his inauguration in 1961 and later went on to head up the agency’s Rhode Island office, the Boston Globe reported.

He died of a heart attack in Easton, Mass. on Nov. 19 at age 80.

The paper reported that Lardner told his family he was proud to be the kid from Lowell who grew up to guard the president.

But he was mum about most everything else about the Kennedy years, the Globe reported.

“There’s a reason we’re called the Secret Service,” Lardner often told his nephew, Michael Walsh of Bedford, N.H., according to the Globe.

Lardner, a US Marine Corps captain, was a Secret Service agent from 1959 until his retirement in 1983 as special agent in charge of Rhode Island and Bristol County, Mass.

“My dad lived his life by the Marine Corps code,” God, corps, and country, his oldest daughter, Kristin M. Brown of East Sandwich, Mass., told the Globe. “It was just the way his life was.”

The Globe reported that Lardner never talked about his assignment on the day Kennedy was shot or whether he was even in Dallas.

“He would never tell,” his daughter said.

“He had strong opinions about the assassination, but it was very difficult for him to talk about,” she told the Globe. “He was never a man at a loss for words, but it was the one subject you just couldn’t approach him about.”

After the assassination, he protected Jacqueline Kennedy and her children. His family told the Globe they believe Jackie Kennedy personally requested him.

The Globe reported that Lardner was a life-long Republican and supported state candidates including Senator Scott Brown.

“The only time I saw him cry in the 33 years I knew him was the day President Reagan died,” his daughter told the Globe. “He adored him.”