Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

January 2020
S M T W T F S
« Dec    
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: study

FBI Study on ‘Lone Offender Terrorism’ Reveals Common Traits Among Attackers

Terrorism exercise in Portland. Photo via FBI.

By Steve Neavling

ticklethewire.com

A new FBI study examining “lone offender terrorism” found common traits that could help identify future attackers.

Of the 52 examined cases between 1972 and 2015, 83% were carried out by people who had previously exhibited hostility or aggression, according to the 81-page report. In all of the cases, people around the attackers expressed concern over their behavior.

In 96% of the cases, the offender produced a video, blog or letter that was intended to be viewed by others.

“Absent this report and others like it, someone could see something and they’re solely relying on their gut feeling or spider sense to say, ‘That doesn’t look right,’ or ‘That’s concerning,’” Special Agent John Wyman, chief of the Behavioral Analysis Unit (BAU)’s Behavioral Threat Assessment Center, which conducted the research, said. “I think by putting this information out there, it helps people get over that barrier. It gives you something to fall back on to validate whatever your gut feeling was.”

The study found that half of the cases were motivated by anti-government extremism. Other significant motivators were racial extremism and Islamist violence.

All of the attackers were men, mostly white and a vast majority born in the U.S. Most were single and had free time to focus on the attacks and their grievances.

Justice Department Study: Ambush Attacks on Police Remain Steady, But Are Increasingly Deadly

badge-policeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The number of ambush attacks against law enforcement remains steady – with about 200 a year – but more police are getting killed as a result, a Justice Department study found.

The study examined surprise attacks between 1990 to 2013 and concluded that there is reason for alarm and that “officers must not only be guardians of the public but also be prepared to respond to violence targeting them,” The Washington Post reports.  

“As part of our work to support these brave men and women, the Department of Justice is committed to extensive efforts aimed at preventing violent action against the police,” Lynch said in a statement. “This report will serve as a critical base of knowledge as we work to defend our law enforcement and ensure our officers’ safety.”

One deterrent, the study found, was in-car cameras.

Click here to see the report.

FBI Study: Steep Rise in Mass Shootings as More People Die; Shootings Often End Before Police Arrive

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A new study by the FBI reveals that mass shootings are on the rise and killing more people.

The Wall Street Journal reports that the study found 160 “active-shooter” events from 2000 to 2013.

The study defines an “active shooter” as “an individual actively engaged in killing or attempting to kill people in a populated area.”

The average number of active-shooter incidents in a year was 16.4 between 2006 and 2013, a steep rise from an average 6.4 a year from 2000 to 2006.

In those periods, 486 people were killed and 557 wounded.

Interestingly, the study found that the shootings often lasted less than two minutes and two-thirds ended before police arrived.

“Many active shooters have a real or perceived deeply held personal grievance, and the only remedy that they can perceive for that grievance is an act of catastrophic violence against a person or an institution,” said FBI behavioral analysis expert Andre Simons.

Senators Call for Government Study on DEA’s Role in Prescription Drug Shortage

Sen. Grassley/official photo

Shoshanna Utchenik
ticklethewire.com

Could the DEA be doing more harm than good with its efforts to curb prescription drug abuse?

Sen. Chuck Grassley of Iowa and Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island are asking the Government Accountability Office to study how the DEA’s crackdowns on controlled substances may be creating shortages of vital prescription meds for doctors in the field.

Grassley says in his office’s press release, “More and more, emergency medical technicians report shortages of medicines they need in the field.”

“Patients need access to the right treatment at the right time,” Whitehouse added, “and we need to balance the DEA’s mission to fight prescription drug abuse against patients’ need for proper care.”

The DEA sets controlled substance quotas, and in effect, production limits, for drug companies. Since the drug shortage crisis developed, controlled substances are frequently on the FDA drug shortage list. While the shortage creates crisis for emergency care workers and their patients, recent studies indicate prescription drug abuse continues to rise.

Read Grassley’s press release here.