Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

November 2019
S M T W T F S
« Oct    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: synthetic drugs

DEA to Open New Office in China to Combat Sale of Synthetic Drugs

Synthetic opioid tablets

Synthetic opioid tablets

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Hoping to combat China’s role in the drug trade, the DEA is planning to open a new office in Southern China, and a top administrator is visiting the country next week.

The visit will be the first in more than a decade for the DEA, the Associated Press reports. 

DEA Acting Administrator Chuck Rosenberg plans to visit Beijing, Guangzhou and Hong Kong next week.

China invited the DEA to help crack down on the increasing sale of synthetic drugs to the U.S.

If all goes as planned, two special agents will occupy a new office in the city of Guangzhou.

“Intelligence and investigative information have shown that Guangzhou has strong ties to international drug trafficking organizations operating in China and elsewhere,” Russell Baer, a DEA special agent in Washington, said in an email. “These criminal groups in Guangzhou utilize trade-based money laundering schemes to legitimize drug profits, use the port facilities as a transit point to ship illegal narcotics, and purchase synthetic drugs along with precursor chemicals.”

Other Stories of Interest

DEA Head Warns of Alarming Increase in Overdoses from Synthetic Drugs

The use of synthetic drugs is reaching alarming levels.

The use of synthetic drugs is reaching alarming levels.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Synthetic designer drugs are causing an alarming number of overdoses, especially among young people, DEA head Chuck Rosenberg told a U.S. Senate Committee. 

The DEA has been trying to curb the use and delivery of synthetic drugs since they became increasingly popular in 2010. Trouble is, synthetic drug makers are churning out products faster than the federal government can ban them, Reuters reports. 

“For every one substance we’ve controlled, legislatively or administratively, there are 11 more out there that are uncontrolled,” Rosenberg said.

“We’re playing catch-up, and we need your help.”

Synthetic drugs include bath salts, counterfeit painkillers and cannabinoids that mimic marijuana.

Other Stories of Interest

What Took D.C. So Long to Respond to the Problem of Synthetic Drugs?

Screen Shot 2015-09-08 at 9.39.04 AM

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Washington, like a lot of other major cities, has had to deal with the plague of synthetic drugs for years. But the city  has been slow to respond, writes Jeffrey Anderson in the D.C. City Paper. 

Anderson writes about authorities charging Nebiyu Jamal Fanta, who worked at the  Benning Market & Dollar Plus in a tough section of D.C.

Anderson writes:

Until this summer, Fanta’s was one of only five cases on file in D.C. Superior Court, even as MPD Chief Cathy Lanier and Mayor Muriel Bowser cite synthetic drugs as a contributing factor to a recent spike in D.C. homicides and tout some 70 synthetic drug-related arrests this year. Overdoses among homeless persons have further elevated the issue to what is being described as a public health crisis and a threat to public safety. D.C. officials said they initially suspected synthetic drugs were a factor in the stabbing death of 24-year-old American University graduate Kevin Sutherland aboard a Metro Red Line train on July 4, then began to question the suspect’s mental state. Lanier has cited the drugs as a factor in three other unidentified homicides, and in July, the Pretrial Services Agency says 20 percent of recent violent crime suspects had tested positive for synthetic drugs.

Now, after years of dithering, and in the midst of a summer crime wave, D.C. officials have leapt into action with a series of legislative, regulatory, and investigative efforts—both civil and criminal—aimed at preventing the drugs from overwhelming a city. But in spite of the newfound urgency, the question remains: What took them so long?

To read the full story click here. 

Overdoses of Synthetic Drug, Spice, Surges As More People Abuse It

spice_race_article2By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Overdoses or other problems from taking synthetic drugs are skyrocketing as demonstrated by the increasing number of calls to poisoning control centers about “spice,” ABC 15 reports.

In Arizona alone, poison control centers have fielded 140 calls.

“It scared me a lot,” Joshua Truax, a recovering spice addict, said.

Truax said he first smoked spice when he was 15 and quickly became addicted.

“I gave everything to my buddy and I said, ‘don’t let me get high anymore’,” Truax told ABC 15. “And within 10 minutes I was fighting him to get my stuff back and get high again.”

Spice often comes from China and is a combination of hazardous chemicals.

The side-effects are alarming – psychotic episodes and hallucinations.

Other Stories of Interest

Synthetic Drug Craze Involving LSD-Like Substance Has Killed 19 People So Far

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA is trying to crack down on the latest synthetic drug craze that is responsible for at least 19 deaths nationwide, KGUN9-TV report.

The drug is called “N-bomb” and has similar hallucinatory effects of LSD.

But users are buying the drug from amateur chemists who are selling the product online.

“It’s like playing Russian Roulette, because you just don’t know what you’re getting. They may just mix in any other lethal substances into these drugs,” said Spokesperson for the DEA Phoenix Division Special Agent Ramona Sanchez.

The DEA temporarily banned the drug while it conducts further research.

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

 

DEA-Led Crackdown on Synthetic Drugs Netted 150 Arrests Across 29 States

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA carried out a nationwide crackdown on synthetic drugs early Wednesday, netting 150 arrests and at least $20 million in cash and assets, Time reports.

This is the second phase of an operation dubbed “Project Synergy,” which began in December 2012 and went after products marketed as “spice,” “bath salts,” and “molly.” Those drugs are dangerous because they’re often laced with illegal chemicals that cause dangerous symptoms and health problems.

The operation focused on 29 states and included roads of hundreds of warehouses, smoke shops and houses.

“Many who manufacture, distribute and sell these dangerous synthetic drugs found out first hand today that DEA will target, find and prosecute those who have committed these crimes,” said DEA Administrator Michele M. Leonhart.

DEA Albuquerque Office Gets New Leadership Role As Assistant Special Agent in Charge

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Sean R. Waite, a longtime DEA agent, has been appointed as a new agent in charge of the agency’s Albuquerque, NM, office, the Republic reports.

Waite replaces Keith Brown, who left to become the agent in charge of the DEA’s New Orleans field office last year.

The office is part of the El Paso Field Division, which has been busy with synthetic drug trafficking.

DEA Launches ‘Largest’ Ever Worldwide Crackdown on Synthetic Drugs

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA has launched what it calls its “largest ever” crackdown on synthetic drugs, arresting more than 150 people in 49 cities and five countries, the U.S. News & World Report writes.

The bust is good news for authorities who have seen the devastating impact of designer synthetic drugs, which often are marketed to teens as a harmless product such as bath salts or herbal incense. Users have suffered from seizures, hallucinations, significant organ damage and even death, according to the DEA.

More than 225 people were arrested.

“This is a significant seizure of synthetic drugs and is a terrific result for our respective law enforcement agencies,” said Graham Fletcher, Australia’s acting ambassador to the United States, in the DEA statement. “Australia remains committed to sharing intelligence with its U.S. partners to combat transnational crime across international borders. This is a win for our collective communities.”