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Tag: tax returns

Former U.S. Attorney: Good Reason to Believe Mueller Has Obtained Trump’s Tax Returns

President Trump, via White House

President Trump, via White House

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A former prosecutor for the U.S. Attorney’s Office said there’s good reason to believe special counsel Robert Mueller already has President Trump’s tax returns as part of his investigation into Russia’s meddling in the 2016 general election.

“Based on my years of experience conducting complex white-collar investigations as a federal prosecutor, it suggests to me that Mueller has already obtained tax returns as part of his investigation,” Renato Mariotti,  a former federal prosecutor in the Securities and Commodities Fraud Section of the United States Attorney’s Office in Chicago, wrote in a column for The Hill

Mariotti notes that Mueller’s ability to obtain a search warrant to raid the home of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort indicates the special counsel has a good reason to believe a federal crime was committed.

Mariotti wrote:

One typical step that federal prosecutors take near the beginning of white-collar investigations is obtaining tax returns. I worked with federal prosecutors who obtained tax returns in every single white-collar investigation they worked on. I didn’t do that, but I obtained tax returns in most white-collar cases I investigated, particularly cases involving financial transactions.

Obtaining a subject’s tax returns can be a useful tool in almost any investigation. They tell you where the person invests their money, where their bank accounts are, where they have debts and who they’ve given money to. Often the information found in a tax return can tell a prosecutor which financial institutions and corporate entities to subpoena for records.

At times, obtaining tax returns can lead to evidence of tax offenses. If an individual receives money that is not reported in the tax return or is misrepresented, that can be charged as a separate federal crime. Hiding financial transactions also can be used as evidence that the subject knew that the underlying source of the money was illegal. 

Other Stories of Interest

Secret Service Agents Go After Tenn. Man in Theft of Mitt Romney’s Tax Returns

Michael Brown

 
By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A Franklin, Tenn. man says Secret Service agents knocked down his door in September as part of a probe into the theft of Mitt and Ann Romney’s tax returns from PricewaterhouseCoopers.

Problem is, suspect Michael Brown says he has no idea why they’ve come after him.

The station reported that Brown said on Sept. 14 at 6:14 a.m. Secret Service agents kicked down the door to his home and forced him and his wife out of their bed in handcuffs.

“They said they’re here to serve a search warrant for Romney’s tax returns,” Brown told the station. “My first reaction was, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me.'”

To read full story click here. 

 

Thieves Target Tax Returns

Visit msnbc.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Court of Appeals Upholds Actor Wesley Snipes’ Tax Conviction and Prison Term

Wesley Snipes

Wesley Snipes

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Actor Wesley Snipes is still in big trouble.

The U.S. Court of Appeals in Atlanta has  refused to overturn his conviction and three year prison term for tax evasion, Courthouse News Service reported. He was convicted of failing to file tax returns from 1999 to 2001. An investigative report alleged that he tried hiding assets in foreign accounts.

Courthouse News Service reported that Snipes claimed in his appeal that the trial should have been held in New York, not Florida, and he should have gotten probation, not prison time.

“Although Snipes argues that there were mitigating factors that the judge did not specifically mention at sentencing, these facts – his college education, his family, and his charitable activities – do not compel the conclusion that the sentence … as substantively unreasonable,” Judge Stanley Marcus wrote, according to the news service.