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Tag: testing

DEA Says Decision on Reclassification of Marijuana Could Be Soon

Photo by Steve Neavling.

Photo by Steve Neavling.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The DEA may be close to reaching a decision on rescheduling marijuana to recognize the medical benefits.

The DEA spokesman Russ Baer said no determination has been made yet on rescheduling pot, but the process is in the “final stages” of an eight-factor evaluating process, High Times reports. 

“I can’t give you a time frame as to when we may announce a decision,” Baer said. “We’re closer than we were a month ago. It’s a very deliberate process.”

High Times wrote:

All of the wild-eyed hope for a marijuana reschedule really heated up this year when the DEA fired off a letter to Senator Elizabeth Warren in April, suggesting that the agency’s plan was to make a rescheduling announcement “in the first half of 2016.” Of course, confusion surrounding the implications of the DEA’s agenda quickly produced a number of ridiculous reports implying that marijuana was soon to be made legal in every state across the nation. This is far from true.

As it stands, marijuana is classified a Schedule I, dangerous drug under the confines of the Controlled Substances Act. In the eyes of the federal government, this means that anything derived from the cannabis plant has no medicinal value and a high potential for abuse. But a schedule downgrade would make some modest changes to Uncle Sam’s hammer-fisted attitude toward the herb—opening up the plant to be considered as having some worth in the scope of modern medicine.

Letter Addressed to White House Headed to Third Round of Testing for Cyanide

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

 Did an envelope addressed to the White House contain cyanide?

It’s going to take a third round of testing after the initial biological testing came back negative but a follow-up test found a “presumptive positive” for the deadly poison, the Secret Service said.

The New York Times reports that the letter was found in an off-site facility where White House mail is screened. 

The Secret Service declined to further discuss the issue.

In early 2013, a Mississippi man sent a ricin-laced letter to President Obama, Sen. Roger Wicker and Mississippi judge Sadie Holland. He was sentenced to 25 years in prison, The Times wrote.

Defense: FBI’s Tests On Ricin Were Unreliable, Shouldn’t be Allowed in Court

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An Ohio man charged with creating the deadly toxin ricin is arguing that the FBI’s tests on the white powder found in his home were faulty, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports.

The defense team for Jeff Boyd Levenderis, 65, argued during an evidentiary hearing Tuesday that the FBI’s findings were unreliable and should not be admissible in court.

At the ending of the hearing, which continues today, the judge is expected to decide whether the tests can be admitted in court, the Plain Dealer wrote.

The Tallmadge man has been in federal custody since January 2011.

 

OTHER STORIES OF INTEREST

Justice Dept. to Stop Pushing Defendants in Guilty Pleas to Waive Right to DNA Testing

Holder delivers speech recently in Orlando/ticklethewire.com photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — A Justice Department policy during the Bush-era is about to get the boot.

The Washington Post reports that Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. will issue a memo Thursday to U.S. Attorneys around the country saying that he’s overturning a policy which urged prosecutors to push defendants hammering out guilty pleas to waive their right to DNA testing in their cases, a right which is guaranteed under federal law.

The Post wrote that the “waivers have been in widespread use in federal cases for about five years and run counter to the national movement toward allowing prisoners to seek post-conviction DNA testing to prove their innocence. More than 260 wrongly convicted people have been exonerated by such tests, though virtually all have been state prisoners.”

To read more click here.

TSA to Have Roving Explosive Testers at Airports

Airport crowdBy Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

WASHINGTON — The Transportation Security Administration is taking airport security up a notch.

USA Today reports that airport screeners in a few weeks will begin randomly going up to people at airport security checkpoint lines or at gates and taking chemical swabs from passengers and their bags to check for explosives. Metal detectors cannot detect such material.

The paper reported that the program has already been tested at five airports since the Christmas Day bombing incident in Detroit.

A private security analyst told USA Today that random checks will “create increasing uncertainty for the adversaries, which is always positive.”

To read more click here.

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