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Tag: tracking device

Man Arrested After Threatening to Detonate Explosive-Laden Burrito at FBI Office

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A man convinced that the FBI had implanted a tracking device into his head threatened to detonate an explosive burrito at the bureau’s Albuquerque field office, the Albuquerque Journal reports.

Brian DeMarco, 50, called up the FBI from his Super 8 motel room to warn that he planned to blow up a explosives-rigged Mexican lunch wrap, the FBI told the Journal.

Additionally, DeMarco, who also complained that the FBI was beaming photos into his brain, said he had placed a bomb at the Albuquerque Social Security Administration building.

DeMarco, who said he’d been diagnosed with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, was arrested at a bus station and no explosives were found.

Law Enforcement’s Use of Cell Phone Tracker Device Fuels Constitutional Debate

By JENNIFER VALENTINO-DEVRIES
Wall Street Journal

For more than a year, federal authorities pursued a man they called simply “the Hacker.” Only after using a little known cellphone-tracking device—a stingray—were they able to zero in on a California home and make the arrest.

Stingrays are designed to locate a mobile phone even when it’s not being used to make a call. The Federal Bureau of Investigation considers the devices to be so critical that it has a policy of deleting the data gathered in their use, mainly to keep suspects in the dark about their capabilities, an FBI official told The Wall Street Journal in response to inquiries.

A stingray’s role in nabbing the alleged “Hacker”—Daniel David Rigmaiden—is shaping up as a possible test of the legal standards for using these devices in investigations.

The FBI says it obtains appropriate court approval to use the device. Stingrays are one of several new technologies used by law enforcement to track people’s locations, often without a search warrant. These techniques are driving a constitutional debate about whether the Fourth Amendment, which prohibits unreasonable searches and seizures, but which was written before the digital age, is keeping pace with the times.

To read more click here.

 

Calif. Student Sues FBI for Putting GPS Tracking Device on Car

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

A 20-year-old Egyptian-American college student in California filed a lawsuit against the FBI on Wednesday, saying the agency violated his civil rights when it secretly placed a GPS tracking device on his car, the Associated Press reported.

Yasir Afifi, a student at Mission College in Santa Clara, Calif., who insists the FBI has no reason to show interest in him, discovered the tracking device last October after a mechanic doing an oil change pointed it out, AP reported. The suit was filed by Council on American-Islamic Relations, claims the FBI violated his civil rights by putting the device on his car without a warrant.

AP reported that Afifi travels frequently to the Middle East and helps support his two brothers. His late father, awell-known Islamic-American community leader, died last year in Egypt.

FBI spokesman Michael Kortan declined to talk specifics, but told the AP: “The FBI conducts investigations under well-established Department of Justice and FBI guidelines that determine what investigative steps or techniques are appropriate. Those guidelines also ensure the protection of civil and constitutional rights.”