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Tag: uss cole

CIA Drone Kills al-Qaeda Leader Fahd al-Quso Tied to USS Cole Bombingmen

Fahd Mohammed Ahmed al-Quso/fbi photo

Shoshanna Utchenik
ticklethewire.com

In the war on terror, success can sometimes bring retaliation.

Global terrorist Fahd al-Quso, who had links to the USS Cole bombing, was killed in Yemen Sunday, according to Yemeni officials and confirmed by al-Qaeda, reports USA Today.

A CIA drone strike killed the top al-Qaeda leader, on the FBI Most-Wanted list for the bombing of of the ship in 2000. The CIA mission was coordinated with the U.S. military and Yemeni government, who have been partners in battle against al-Qaeda in southern Yemen.

Reports indicate that a surprise attack by al-Qaeda militants against a Yemeni army base early Monday may have been retaliation for the death of al-Quso. The cycle of violence continues as the militants killed 20 soldiers, captured 25, and made off with weapons and hardware by land and sea, according to USA Today.

Al-Quso was released from a Yemeni prison in 2007, having served 5 years for his role in the USS Cole bombing in which 17 American sailors were killed and 39 injured. He was also implicated in the failed Underwear bomber attempt, in a 2009 Christmas flight over Detroit.

To read more click here.

 

Column: Ex-FBI Agent Says U.S. Must Close Case on USS Cole

uss-cole-crest-234x300Ali H. Soufan was an F.B.I. special agent from 1997 to 2005.

By ALI H. SOUFAN
New York Times Op-Ed

TEN years ago, Qaeda terrorists blew a hole in the side of the Navy destroyer Cole in Yemen, killing 17 sailors. Yet the attack’s mastermind still hasn’t been prosecuted, and many of the men tried and imprisoned for the bombing are again free.

As Washington debates whether to increase aid to Yemen, it should first remember its duty to seek justice for those sailors — and to heed the broader national-security lessons from the attack.

As soon as the F.B.I. received news of the Oct. 12 bombing, I flew to Yemen with a team to investigate. The bodies of sailors draped in flags on a blood-stained deck, guarded by teary-eyed survivors, formed a heartbreaking image that motivated us during the following months.

Our investigation faced difficulties from the beginning. Yemen’s weak central government’s on-again, off-again relationship with extremists meant that Al Qaeda had influential sympathizers in positions of authority, as well as among powerful tribes in the country’s vast desert. As a consequence, we regularly faced death threats, smokescreens and bureaucratic obstructions.

To read more click here.