best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

October 2018
S M T W T F S
« Sep    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031  

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Watergate

Watergate Prosecutor Calls Trump ‘An Unindicted Co-Conspirator’ After Cohen Plea Deal

Nick Akerman

By Steve Neavling
Ticklethewire.com

Nick Akerman knows a thing or two about corruption in the White House: He was one of the Watergate prosecutors who helped bring down President Nixon.

So what did Akerman think of Michael Cohen implicating his former longtime client, President Trump, on Tuesday?

“There’s no question about it,” Akerman told MSNBC. “This makes the president of the United States an unindicted co-conspirator.”

The ominous term, “unindicted co-conspirator,” was used by the Watergate grand jury to describe Nixon’s involvement in the scandal.

“This is the first time this has happened since Richard Nixon was named as an unindicted co-conspirator in the Watergate trial,” Akerman said. “This is a big deal.”

Akerman wasn’t alone in using the Watergate-era phrase to describe Trump.

“If the prosecutors accept what is in this indictment, then the president just became an unindicted co-conspirator,” said Jonathan Turley, a law professor at George Washington University. “If they believe that what’s in this indictment was true, and that he was directed to make this payment … then the president just became an unindicted co-conspirator, and he could become an indicted co-conspirator depending on the timing and circumstances.”

Washington Post Editorial: Reputation of Justice Department ‘Is Now More In Danger Than It Has Been Since Watergate’

President Donald Trump

By The Washington Post Editorial Board

THURSDAY BROUGHT a sad moment for the Justice Department. The department filed a brief in a frivolous legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. But instead of following nearly all past practice, the department sided with the challengers. Defending major, duly passed federal statutes is a core Justice Department responsibility. If it defended only laws the president liked, uncertainty about the permanence of many laws would reign, particularly as the presidency changed hands.

There is some precedent for the Justice Department’s move. During the Obama presidency, the department declined to defend the Defense of Marriage Act, a law that, though noxious, Congress passed and President Bill Clinton signed. Government lawyers should have defended it up to the point at which the Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional. By declining to do so, they inadvertently gave the department’s current leadership some cover to refuse to defend Obamacare.

Yet there are big differences. The Defense of Marriage Act, which denied federal benefits to legally united same-sex couples, was so obviously rooted in prejudice that it posed a major threat to important constitutional principles. The challengers to that law had by leaps and bounds the better side of the argument. The latest challenge to Obamacare, by contrast, is harebrained.

The editorial concludes:

The nation’s premier law enforcement agency built a reputation for evenhandedness and independence over the course of decades. That reputation is now more in danger than it has been since Watergate. The threat derives not from self-serving accusations that Justice officials conspired against Mr. Trump but from Mr. Trump and his enablers politicizing the department.

To read the full editorial click here.

Sally Yates: Trump ‘Tearing Down the Legitimacy’ of the Justice Department

Former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Sally Yates, the acting Attorney General fired by President Donald Trump last year, says the president’s caustic tweets aimed at Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and special counsel Robert Mueller are collectively “tearing down the legitimacy” of the Justice Department, Yahoo! News reports.

Yates, speaking at the 2018 Ideas Conference hosted by the Center for American Progress on Tuesday, urged the country not to ignore Trump’s attacks on the rule of law, Yahoo! News reports.

“What I worry about is the normalization of so much that is not normal,” said Yates.

“There is a time-honored tradition at the Department of Justice, at least since Watergate, that is nonpartisan,” Yates said. “There is a wall between the Department of Justice and the White House when it comes to criminal investigations and prosecutions.”

Trump has been hammering away at that wall so often and with such ferocity, she said, “nobody’s rolling their eyes anymore,” Yahoo! reports.

 

Weekend Series on Crime History: A Documentary on Watergate

Weekend Series on Crime History: The Watergate Indictments in 1974

Weekend Series on Crime History: Nixon Defends Against Watergate Allegations

Weekend Series on Crime History: Nixon, Ehrlichman, Haldeman Talk About John Mitchell’s Watergate Involvement

Donald Trump Insisted Clinton’s Email Scandal Far Worse Than Watergate

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Donald Trump insisted Tuesday that Hillary Clinton’s handling of emails was far more scandalous than Watergate.

Trump also criticized the Justice Department, saying it was tougher on Richard Nixon that Clinton, the Washington Post reports. 

“This is far bigger and a far bigger scandal than Watergate ever was, but with Watergate we had Justice, we had a Justice Department that went after the people,” Trump said. “Here’s something that just, nobody’s ever seen anything like this.”

Trump insisted the Justice Department’s refusal to charge Clinton is evidence of a “rigged system.”