best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter


[quads id=4]

Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

June 2018
S M T W T F S
« May    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter


[quads id=3]

Tag: world trade center

David LeValley, Head of Atlanta FBI, Dies From Complication Related to 9/11 Work at World Trade Center

David J. LeValley

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

David J. LeValley, head of the Atlanta FBI, died Saturday from complications related to the 9/11 attack, the FBI said Saturday.

In a statement, the FBI said:

Mr. LeValley entered on duty as a special agent with the FBI in 1996 and was assigned to the New York Division. He was called to serve his country following the attacks on 9/11 at the World Trade Center, where he spent several weeks being exposed to many contaminants. Dave died in the line of duty as a direct result of his work at the World Trade Center.

“It’s important as we move further away from 911 that people do not forget what we lost on 9/11, right away or later. He had to know he was making a sacrifice that day, I have no doubt. He never complained,” retired FBI agent Steve Emmett tells WSB-TV in Atlanta.

A number of FBI who responded to different 9/11 sites have died from cancer related to work at the sites including the Pentagon and the World Trade Center.

Leader of Albany’s FBI Office to Head Up FBI Washington Field Office

Andrew Vale

Andrew Vale

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Andrew Vale, special agent in charge of the Albany office, is leaving his post at the end of the month to become assistant director in charge of the bureau’s Washington D.C. field office.

Vale may best be known as the leader of the investigation into the first bombing of the World Trade Center, the Times Union reports. 

“It is with tremendously mixed emotions,” Vale said about his departure in an interview at his office. “This area has become home for me and my family.”

The FBI has only three assistant directors in the country – one at each field office in New York City, Los Angeles and Washington D.C.

“Really I just wanted to make a difference,” Vale, a 25-year-veteran of the FBI said. “I kind of viewed the FBI as being elite and wanted to work for an organization that was all about making a difference in the communities that we served.”

ticklethewire.com Salutes Federal Law Enforcement in Its Battle Against Terrorism and Honors Those Who Died on Sept. 11, 2001

istock image

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

I still remember walking down Connecticut Avenue in Washington, headed to the subway, when I ran into a friend who told me that a plane had crashed into the World Trade Center.

About 20 minutes later, when I got off the subway downtown at the Farragut North stop, I bumped into an editor at the Washington Post who told me the city was under attack. There was eerie feeling in the city. Some people were already heading home even though they had just gotten downtown. There was a sense of chaos. A sense of fear. A sense of uncertainty.

When I got into the Post newsroom, everyone was standing around television sets, watching the events of Sept. 11 unfold. Shortly after, we all got our assignments for the day.

In the days that followed, I felt like life would never be the same, we would never feel safe again. We all felt so vulnerable. A few days later, I was at the BWI airport near Baltimore, waiting for a flight to Detroit to report on a story for the Post. Everyone in line was looking at everyone else, paranoid, looking to see if there were any potential terrorists.

Thankfully, in time, a sense of normalcy returned to our lives. But we knew things would never be the same, from the the airport experience to concerns about abandon packages to the threat of al Qaeda.

We learned about Code Orange. We saw law enforcement change, most notably the FBI, that shifted significant resources to address counterterrorism. We got involved in two wars.

Since 9/11, federal law enforcement has unearthed a number of terrorist plots. It deserves a great deal of credit.

Granted, things haven’t been perfect. Some folks at the FBI aren’t happy with the way resources were divided up. Groups like the ACLU have raised questions about privacy, about stings, about civil rights, about torture. Republicans and Democrats have had heated debates about the proper venue to prosecute suspected terrorists and about reading Miranda Warnings. Politics have sometimes hijacked the true concerns about terrorism.

Federal law enforcement can’t stop everything. It can’t make us feel 100 percent safe. And yes, it can still improve upon what its done and how it does it. But it deserves a great deal of credit for the job its done since 9/11.

It ain’t easy and it won’t be in the future.

FBI Donates Artifacts from 9/11 Attack to Newseum in D.C.

Cellphones and pagers donated to museum/newseum photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

We all remember that eerie day — Sept. 11, 2001 — when terrorists took a routine Tuesday and shook it so hard and turned it upside down and changed forever  the way we travel and think about security and radical movements abroad.

To bring back some vivid memories, the FBI has donated dozens of artifacts to the Newseum in Washington including engine parts and landing gear from airlines that crashed into the World Trade Center, cellphones and pagers recovered from the Trade Center — some which rang for days after the attack — and personal belongings of airplane passengers.

The museum, in a press release, said the artifacts are part of a display on the FBI’s role in fighting terrorism before and after Sept. 11, 2001.

It will be open to the public beginning  Sept. 2.

 

The Oklahoma Bombing 16 Years Later: We’re No Longer Surprised

After the bombing/fbi photo

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Sixteen years ago today, America was served up one horrific surprise: The bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Building in Oklahoma City: 168 people died.

It was shocker.

At the time — April 19, 1995 –  as a reporter at the Detroit News, I called around to federal law enforcement people, checking to see what they knew. Some speculated that it was foreign terrorists, just like in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

Others suggested it had something to do with Waco. The foreign terrorist theory sounded more palatable. The idea of our own citizens committing such an atrocity seemed unlikely.

I was wrong.

Two days later, I was headed up to Decker, Mi., about two hours outside of Detroit, to check out a farm  the FBI and ATF  agents were raiding.  The farm belonged to James Nichols. His brother Terry and Tim McVeigh had spent time there. Terry Nichols and Tim McVeigh were later convicted. McVeigh was put to death.

Now, 16 years later, we’ve evolved. The  thought of one our own committing a terrorist act simply doesn’t phase us.  A lone wolf. A naturalized citizen. A convert.  An anti-government fanatic. Nothing surprises us any more.

Sixteen years isn’t a particularly noteworthy milestone. But around this time of year, I always feel like its worth noting and offering condolences to the many families who lost loved ones in Oklahoma City.

[quads id=1]