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Archive for April 19th, 2013

CAPTURED! After an Intense Hunt, Second Brother is Taken Into Custody

By Annie Gowen, Sari Horwitz and and David A. Fahrenthold
Washington Post

WATERTOWN, Mass. — Police arrested the second suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing here Friday night after a day-long manhunt led them to the wounded man hiding in a back yard.

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was found after a resident in Watertown saw blood on a boat parked behind his home. The man looked under a plastic cover and saw a man inside the boat, covered in blood.

Officers responded, and they exchanged gunfire with the suspect and threw “flash-bang” grenades into the boat in an attempt to flush him out. The suspect was later seized by a SWAT team after he did not respond to negotiators. Police said Tsarnaev was in serious condition at a hospital.

To read more click here.

 

Weekend Series on Crime: A Vintage FBI Bank Robbery Training Film

Column: April 19 and Boston Bombing Remind Us We Can’t Drop Our Guard

By Allan Lengel
Deadline Detroit

DETROIT — It was noon on a Friday. I was reporter at The Detroit News. It was two days after the April 19, 1995 Oklahoma City bombing.

 Before long, another reporter and I were speeding north on I-75 to Decker, in the Michigan Thumb, to check out an FBI raid at a farmhouse where suspects Terry Nichols and Tim McVeigh had spent time.

When we arrived, it was a full-blown circus. Media satellite trucks were camped along the dirt road bordering the farm, and reporters were walking about, interviewing locals. Federal agents crawled all over the farm, looking for clues.

I even spotted undercover ATF agents walking along the perimeter of the farm, trying to befriend locals to find out information that might shed light on the attack that killed 168 people. One of them, who I knew, waived me away as I approached.

It was in the coming days that we would hear about the local militias and the harsh anti-government sentiments, some of them the result of government foreclosures on farms.

It was an eye-opener not only for the public, but for law enforcement, which realized it had to step up its game and monitor and crack down on the enemy within — the domestic terrorist.

I’m reminded of the tragic bombing in Oklahoma 18 years ago to this day as we process the tragedy in Boston.

To read full column click here.

 

Family: Man Accused of Sending Ricin-Tainted Letters Was Delusional, Chasing Conspiracy Theories


Paul Kevin Curtis

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A 45-year-old Mississippi man accused of sending ricin-tainted letters to national leaders, including President Obama, was a loving father but battled mental illnesses and delusions, family members told the Associated Press.

Paul Kevin Curtis was convinced the government was thwarting an investigation into an elaborate plot sell body parts on the black market, the AP wrote, citing Facebook posts and family members.

“Maybe I have your attention now even if that means someone must die,” the letters read.

“He is bipolar, and the only thing I can say is he wasn’t on his medicine,” his ex-wife, Laura Curtis, told The Associated Press.

FBI Records: Agents Suspected Saudis Living in Florida Provided help to Sept. 11 Hijackers

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

New FBI records suggest that Saudis who had lived in Florida before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks helped the hijackers, prompting revived calls for an investigation into co-conspirators, BrowardBulldog.org reports.

“One question that has gone unanswered through the investigation of 9/11 is ‘Did the hijackers operate alone or did they have accomplices who facilitated their ability to act?” said former Florida Sen. Bob Graham. “I think the information we have now makes a very strong case that they did.”

The relatively obscure news organization BrowardBulldog.com broke the news after acquiring FBI records that showed agents were suspicious of three people who had been living in Sarasota. Two of them were students at the Venice flight school attended by two of the hijackers.

“Further investigation of the [ name deleted ] family revealed many connections between the [ name deleted ] and individuals associated with the terrorist attacks on 9/11/2001,” says an April 16, 2002 FBI report.

Former ATF Supervisor Accidentally Shoots Self At Home

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As a former ATF supervisor and the current Medina police chief in Ohio, Patrick Berarducci knows a thing or two about gun safety. 

But that didn’t stop the 62-year-old with more than 40 years of experience in law enforcement from accidentally shooting himself in the leg at home, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reports.

Beraducci said he was getting ready for work when the gun went off. 

“I put on a new belt and strung the holster through it,” Berarducci told the Plain Dealer. “I pushed my pistol into it (a Smith & Wesson .40 caliber Shield handgun), the holster buckled a little on the inside, just enough to catch the trigger.”

He was not seriously injured.

NPR: How Technology Helped FBI Agents Track Down Bombing Suspects

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Technology has come a long way since Atlanta’s Olympic Park bombing nearly 17 years ago, NPR explains in an audio cast.

The FBI examined more than 10 terabytes of video and images from the Boston Marathon bombing.

To put that into perspective, it would take one person more than five years to look at all of the video and images.

To listen to the audio cast, click here.

Night of Gun Battles Ends with Death of 1 Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect; Other Remains on the Loose

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A wild, bullet-riddled night ended this morning with the death of a campus police officer and one of the suspects in the Boston Marathon bombing; the other bombing suspect was at large as of 8:30 a.m., the New York Times reported this morning.

One of the suspects and an M.I.T. police officer were killed in the shootout.

Police said the suspects are brothers. The surviving one was identified as Dzhokhar A. Tsarnaev, 19, of Cambridge, Mass., the Time reported. The killed suspect was identified as Tamerlan Tsarnaev, 26.

Investigators believe the brothers are Chechens.