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Tag: bomb threat

FBI Investigates Bomb Threats to Refugee Community Center for Muslims

police tapeBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is investigating threats to “blow up” a refugee community center that predominately serves Muslim immigrants.

Police said anonymous, threatening notes were found at the Denver-area center, Reuters reports.

The typewritten notes were left in the parking lot and stairwell of the Mango House. Both letters had the same message: WE’RE GONNA BLOW UP ALL OF YOU REFUGEES.”

The threats come as President Trump is banning people from traveling to the U.S. from seven predominately Muslim countries.

The refugee center in Aurora was evacuated, but no signs of suspicious devices were found.

“This is an ongoing investigation and is a top priority for us,” police spokesman Sergeant Chris Amsler said.  “We don’t tolerate that type of thing in the city of Aurora.”

Dump Truck Driver Claims He Has Bomb, Smashes into FBI Office in Pittsburgh

police lightsBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A dump truck driver slammed into a security gate at the FBI offices in Pittsburgh, saying he had a bomb.

Authorities arrested the driver, Thomas Richard Ross, and found no bomb or connection to terrorism, the Associated Press reports.

The New Waterford, Ohio, man was pulled over by Pittsburgh police late Thursday after running red lights and driving erratically. While pulled over, the man said he had a bomb.

The man floored the gas pedal and smashed into the gate, but the security barriers prevented him from going far.

Ross suffered minor injuries and faces numerous charges, including recklessly endanger another person, aggravated assault and fleeing and eluding.

FBI Arrests Man Accused of Threatening to Blow Up Statue of Liberty

Statue of Liberty/Wikipedia

Statue of Liberty/Wikipedia

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It was no joking matter to law enforcement or the thousands of people who were visiting the Statue of Liberty.

A 42-year-old man is accused of claiming to be a well-known terrorist and calling in a threat to blow up the Statue of Liberty, The Hill reports. 

The FBI and other law enforcement arrested Jason Smith, who is accused of calling 911 on April 24 and saying he was Abdul Yasin, the lone suspect in the 1993 World Trade Center bombing.

Authorities took the threat serious, sending in police dogs and evacuating more than 3,200 people.

Authorities said Smith used his iPad to call in the threat.

Who Tweeted a Bomb Threat That Triggered F-16 Jets to Escort Commercial Aircraft?

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The FBI is investigating a bomb threat made in a tweet that prompted the U.S. military to send F-16 fighter aircraft to escort two jets bound for Atlanta on Saturday, the Associated Press reports.

The threats involved a Southwest Airlines flight from Milwaukee and a Delta Air Lines flight from Portland, Oregon.

Authorities scoured the planes and found no evidence of bombs.

“We certainly take these types of threats seriously and we’re pursuing them aggressively,”Federal Bureau of Investigation Special Agent Stephen Emmett told The Associated Press on Sunday.

“We are continuing to pursue leads in the efforts to locate this individual,” he added.

The military dispatched the fighter jets after being alerted about the tweet.

Seattle Times: FBI ‘Obliterated a Line That Should Have Never Been Crossed’ with Fake News Site

By Seattle Times
Editorial Board

The Associated Press has a well-earned reputation as an independent, credible government watchdog. That’s why the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s appropriation of that credibility in a 2007 case obliterated a line that should never have been crossed.

The laudable end — conviction of a student making school bomb threats — does not justify the government’s outrageous disregard of the role of the press in a free society. In fact, it utterly undermines that role at a time when media companies are struggling to remain strong in the face of government abuses over the last two presidential administrations.

On Monday, Seattle Times reporter Mike Carter reported that, in 2007, the FBI mocked up a fake Associated Press story. The intention was to trick a suspect in a series of bomb threats at Lacey’s Timberline High School to click on a link sent to his MySpace account. All this was done under the authority of a federal warrant.

When the suspect clicked on the link, hidden FBI software revealed the suspect’s location to agents.

Initially, Carter found documents suggesting the FBI had nestled the AP story in an email that looked like it was from a Seattle Times’ website. But FBI officials waited almost a full day after Carter’s story was published Monday evening to suggest that, while using The Times name was contemplated and mocked up, the link to the AP story was not sent using a Times email.

The bomb-threat case was serious, no question, and deserved vigorous enforcement efforts. But agents could have tricked the student in other ways — a free concert ticket or free video game. They should not have assumed the identity of a media organization.

The damage matters: “This ploy violated AP’s name and undermined AP’s credibility,” said Paul Colford, director of AP media relations.

To read more click here.

Seattle Times Outraged After Discovering FBI Created Bogus News Site to Capture Suspect

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI created a bogus Seattle Times web page and posted a fake news story in an attempt to plant software on the computer of a juvenile suspected of making bomb threats at a high school in 2007, the Seattle Times reports.

The discovery by the ACLU was revealed on Twitter and comes less than a month after the FBI revealed it created a fake Facebook account using a real person and photos.

Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the ACLU, said the creation of bogus news site could result in “significant collateral damage to the public trust” if the FBI continues the practice.

Documents show that the FBI attributed the story about bomb threats to the Associated Press.

Once the juvenile clicked on the link, the software sent his location and Internet Protocol information to investigators.

The Seattle Times expressed outrage.

“We are outraged that the FBI, with the apparent assistance of the U.S. Attorney’s Office, misappropriated the name of The Seattle Times to secretly install spyware on the computer of a crime suspect,” said Seattle Times Editor Kathy Best.

“Not only does that cross a line, it erases it,” she said.

“Our reputation and our ability to do our job as a government watchdog are based on trust. Nothing is more fundamental to that trust than our independence — from law enforcement, from government, from corporations and from all other special interests,” Best said. “The FBI’s actions, taken without our knowledge, traded on our reputation and put it at peril.”

How FBI Agents Tracked Down Harvard Student Accused of Making Bomb Threats

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI had a crisis on its hands.

Several bomb threats were sent via email to Harvard University, causing the school to close buildings during final exams.

The student accused of sending in the threat, sophomore Eldo Kim, took steps to hide his identity using two anonymity tools – the routing service Tor and the temporary mail service Guerrilla Mail, the Verge reports.

But the tools were no match for the FBI, which used the information to track down Kim, who was using Harvard’s wireless network.

Kim told authorities he was trying to get out of a final exam.

STORIES OF OTHER INTEREST

FBI: Harvard University Student Sent Bomb Threat to Delay Taking Final Exam

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Harvard University student who wasn’t prepared for his final exam decided to buy himself some time.

On Monday, Eldo Kim, 20, emailed threats that claimed there were “bombs placed around campus” about a half hour before his test, NBC News reports, citing the FBI. Sure enough, the alarms rang at 9 a.m. to evacuate students.

“He knew that his plan had worked,” the affidavit read.

But the next day, the FBI tracked down Kim, who told authorities he was trying to avoid an exam, NBC News wrote.

The Cambridge man is scheduled for a hearing today in U.S. District Court. He faces up to five years in prison, three years of supervised release and a $250,000 fine if convicted of communicating the bomb threat, NBC wrote.

 

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