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Tag: drug cartels

Departing DEA Leader in El Paso Warns of Cartels Smuggling Heroin, Meth to U.S.

Getting HighBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

As the leader of the DEA in El Paso prepares to leave his job for a promotion to lead the Houston Division, he warned that the Mexican cartels are continuing to expand their heroin and meth trafficking business. 

“Every day we try to answer the prayers of those parents who are praying that drugs, violence and crime will pass over their children,” Will R. Glaspy said in an interview last week with El Paso Times

Glaspy, who served more than three years as the special agent in charge of the DEA’s El Paso Division, is scheduled to start working in Houston on Sept. 18.

Glaspy said drug cartels are turning away from marijuana in favor of meth and heroin.

The El Paso Times wrote:

During his time in El Paso, Glaspy said that his agents handled cases such as the arrests of Sinaloa-cartel affiliated drug traffickers in El Paso, Albuquerque meth traffickers and “Operation Crystal Mountain,” which targeted meth dealers on the Mescalero Apache Reservation.

The No. 1 priority in the El Paso region is fighting Mexican drug cartels, with the No. 2 priority being “community impact cases” that target local drug-dealing groups, Glaspy said.

DEA agents deal more with border drug-trafficking issues in El Paso, Las Cruces and Alpine, which covers the vast Big Bend area.

“Basically, what we are trying to do is target command-and-control of the Mexican organizations sending the drugs up here,” Glaspy said.

San Diego Union-Tribune: Advocates of Marijuana Legalization Miss Mark

marijuana-istockBy David W. Murray & John P. Walters
The San Diego Union-Tribune

A recent example of the logical abandon of today’s backers of legal marijuana is the plan to defund the Drug Enforcement Administration’s program to eradicate illegal marijuana (DEA/CESP), an $18 million program that eliminates millions of plants a year and arrests thousands of criminals, many of whom were brought here to labor for Mexican drug cartels controlling the marijuana black market.

Yet Congressman Ted Lieu (D-CA) wants to end the effort as a “ridiculous waste” of federal resources, when multiple states “have already legalized marijuana,” use of which should “no longer be a federal crime.” Clearly, the congressman has not thought this through. He is, in fact, arguing against his own legal marijuana case.

A central tenet of the legalization movement is that criminal marijuana was to be supplanted by “safe, regulated and taxed” marijuana under careful control. It is a contradiction of that principle to foster, by cutting the DEA program, the proliferation of unregulated, untaxed and “unsafe” marijuana plants controlled by violent criminals, thereby corrupting the entire point of a “legalized” marijuana market.

While a “regulated and taxed market” was the position sold to legislators, the real objective seems to be a dope-growing paradise, unregulated and unopposed. Congressman Lieu doesn’t even try to explain how this is supposed to advance America’s well-being.

For years now, Americans have been subjected to efforts by advocates for legalized marijuana to make their case. Today, the arguments often come from legalization lobbyists, often with legal or political training, seeking to legitimize what they hope will become a billion-dollar business in addictive toxins – repeat customers guaranteed.

Or consider the argument that marijuana is “safer to use” than alcohol. That alcohol is dangerous all acknowledge, costing the health of thousands. But the proper argument is that each intoxicant presents its own unique threats. It is not productive medically to “rank” them. But what is the logical implication of the alcohol talking point?

The regulation of alcohol is precisely the idealized model that lobbyists put forth for legal drugs. Hence, every time they insist that alcohol is the more damaging substance, what they are actually showing is that the model of legal, regulated sales of addictive substances produces widespread harm to adults and adolescents.

To read more click here. 

 

Michigan Congresswoman Calls on President Obama to Dispatch National Guard to Address Immigration Crisis

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Michigan congresswoman is urging President Obama to dispatch the National Guard to address a growing humanitarian crisis involving tens of thousands of children illegally crossing the U.S.-Mexico border, Fox News reports.

U.S. Rep. Candice Miller, a Republican, urged the president in a letter to address the overcrowding along the border.

“I strongly urge you to call upon the National Guard to assist our overwhelmed border agents in not only addressing the unfolding humanitarian crisis, but also to assist our agents in defending our border against the violent drug cartels who are increasing smuggling operations as a result of this crisis,” wrote Miller, who is vice chair of the House Homeland Security Committee.

Since October, border patrol officials have apprehended more than 47,000 children – nearly twice the number captured this time last year.

“Rather than carrying out their regular duties, U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers and agents are put in the position of providing basic child care,” Miller said in her letter. “This diversion away from normal patrol responsibilities will result in an increase of drugs and migrants illicitly crossing our border.”

Mexico Comes Clean: Our Soldiers Were in Standoff with U.S. Border Patrol

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

After blanket denials, Mexican officials are admitting that two Mexican soldiers – not smugglers – were in a standoff with Border Patrol agents in January, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Mexico had denied soldiers were involved but finally came clean about the Jan. 26 confrontation.

The soldiers claimed they were looking for drug smugglers.

But some question whether they were really helping drug cartels.

FBI Special Agent Leaves Public Service to Launch Private Firm Aimed at Background Checks, Surveillance


Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

FBI Special Agent Leon Martinez, who investigated 9/11 terrorists, government corruption and drug cartels in Florida, is headed to the private sector after 25 years with the bureau, the Herald-Tribune reports.

Martinez is opening a private investigative firm in Sarasota called the Executive Assessment Group, which will conduct background investigations and surveillance for criminal and civil attorneys.

“He’s a first-class guy and very professional,” said Todd Foster, a Tampa defense attorney.

Joining Martinez will be Mark Flint, a former Florida Department of Law Enforcement special agent; and Don Wenger, a retired Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office detective who supervised the Sheriff’s intelligence unit.

Payday: $29.5 in Forfeited Money Distributed to Law Enforcement Across Texas

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

It’s payday, thanks to a Mexican drug cartel.

The bulk of $29.5 million in money seized by federal authorities from a Mexican cartel boss has been handed out in “asset sharing” funds by ICE, DEA, FBI and other federal agencies to law enforcement agencies across the state of Texas to combat drug cartels, reports the Washington Times.

Osiel Cardenas-Guillen, the former boss of the Gulf drug cartel, forfeited the money as a result of  a February 2010 court order, according to the Times. Guillen was sentenced to 25 years in November of 2010 for threatening to assault two US agents a deputy sheriff from Cameron County, Tex.

“With equitable asset-sharing like this, federal and local law enforcement can really turn the tables on the bad guys,” said James Dinkins, ICE executive director and head of the agency’s Homeland Security Investigations Division. “We simply take their illegal profits and invest them in local law enforcement efforts.”

To read more click here.

 

Issa threatens Holder with contempt over Mexico gun probe

file photo/doj

By Kevin Johnson
USA TODAY

The chairman of the House’s chief investigative committee today threatened Attorney General Eric Holder with contempt of Congress if he failed to provide additional documents in the panel’s ongoing inquiry into allegations that federal agents allowed hundreds of weapons to flow to Mexico and into the hands of drug cartel enforcers.

In a four-page letter, Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., charged that the Justice Department was actively attempting to “obstruct” the panel’s investigation and that documents sought under an October subpoena be delivered by Feb. 9.

“If the department continues to obstruct the congressional inquiry by not providing documents and information, this committee will have no alternative but to move forward with proceedings to hold you in contempt of Congress,” Issa wrote.

To read more click here.

DEA Money Laundering Began Under Reagan, Justice Says

By Danny Fenster
ticklethewire.com

The DEA sting operation involving the laundering of money to drug cartels that has angered some Republican congressmen actually dates back to the Reagan administration, according to the Justice Department.

Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Affairs Ronald Weich sent a letter to Rep. Darrel Issa–the Republic congressman leading the charges against the Justice Department–which said Congress gave the DEA the authority to conduct such operations in 1984, reports a blog from the Houston Chronicle. During Reagan’s time in office DEA investigations laundered as much as $100 million, gaining access to top levels of drug cartel leadership, according to Weich.

Congress gave the Drug Enforcement Administration the authority to conduct such sting runs as far back as 1984, Assistant Attorney General for Legislative Affairs Ronald Weich told Rep. Darrell Issa, R-Calif., in a letter, obtained by Texas on the Potomac. In investigations during the Ronald Reagan administration, some in which agents laundered over $100 million, they gained access to the top levels of drug-cartel leadership, Weich wrote.

To read more click here.

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