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Tag: Enron

Top Criminal Prosecutor at Justice Department Is Leaving Following High-Profile Cases

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Mythili Raman, the Justice Department’s top criminal attorney, is leaving the agency next month following high-profile cases of corporate misdeeds, Reuters reports.

Raman is a 17-year veteran of the department and once acted as chief after her predecessor, Lanny Breuer, stepped down last year.

Raman said she’s not sure what’s next in her career.

A Senate panel today is expected to consider Breuer’s replacement, Leslie Caldwel, a former federal prosecutor who helped prosecute Enron Corp.

Obama Nominates Leslie Caldwell to Top Post in Justice Department Division

 Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A defense lawyer whose expertise is white-collar crime was nominated Tuesday to be assistant attorney general  for the Justice Department’s criminal division, the New York Times reports.

President Obama nominated Leslie R. Caldwell, a former federal prosecutor who worked in the Northern District of California and the Eastern District of New York.

Caldwell served as director of the DOJ’s task force that specialized in Enron’s 2001 collapse, the Times wrote.

She graduated from Penn State University and George Washington University law School.

Former Enron Chief Executive Skilling Could Have Prison Sentenced Reduced

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

The Justice Department is working on a deal that would reduce the prison sentence of former Enron Chief Executive Jeffrey K. Skilling, the Los Angeles Times reports.

Skilling was convicted of insider trading, securities fraud and conspiracy, among other charges, in 2006.

His attorney has been trying to overturn the conviction ever since.

“The Department of Justice is considering entering into a sentencing agreement with the defendant in this matter,” according to a Justice Department note, the LA Times reported. “Such a sentencing agreement could restrict the parties and the Court from recommending, arguing for, or imposing certain sentences or conditions of confinement.”

It’s unclear how much the sentencing would be shortened, if agreed to by a judge, the LA Times wrote.

FBI Agent Said He Was Naive About How Big Enron Case Would Become

By TOM FOWLER
HOUSTON CHRONICLE

When Mike Anderson launched the FBI’s investigation of Enron’s collapse in early December 2001, he thought assigning a couple of agents to the case would be a good start.

“I knew it was going to be a big case,” said Anderson, assistant special agent in charge of the white-collar crime group in Houston. “But I think I was a little naïve about how big.”

Within a few weeks, the investigation had exploded into a national task force with dozens of agents, prosecutors and other specialists working on it from coast to coast.

“It was the biggest FBI investigation at the time and remains one of the most complex in the history of the bureau,” Anderson said.

To read full story click here.

Andrew Weissmann Named FBI’s General Counsel

Andrew Weissmann/photo columbia law

By Allan Lengel
ticklethewire.com

Andrew Weissmann, a private lawyer who once served as the former director of the federal government’s Enron task force, and who also previously served as FBI Director Robert S. Mueller’s special counsel, will become the FBI’s new general counsel, according to the Am Law Daily reported.

The publication reports that Weissman has left his post as cochair of Jenner & Block’s white-collar defense and investigations practice, a New York-based firm he joined in 2006.

Weissmann replaces Valerie Caproni, who became the general counsel at Northrop Grumman Corporation earlier this month, Am Law Daily reported.

The publication reported that he will oversee a 300-lawyer law department.

 

 

Supreme Court Ruling Casts Doubt on Conviction of Enron Exec Skilling and Other Cases

The ruling by the Supreme Court could spell trouble for some federal cases. It will also change the way federal prosecutors charge certain defendants, though  some had started to look at different ways in anticipation of the ruling.

judge and gavelBy Robert Barnes
Washington Post

WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court Thursday restricted one of federal prosecutors’ favorite tools for pursuing corrupt politicians and self-dealing corporate chiefs, and cast doubt on the conviction of former Enron chief Jeffrey Skilling.

It also sent back to a lower court the conviction of newspaper magnate Conrad Black for a decision on whether his conviction should be overturned.

The justices were passing judgment on a federal statute used in the prosecution of both men, and many others. It makes it a crime to deprive the public or one’s employer or shareholders of the “intangible right of honest services.”

Although a favorite of federal prosecutors–it figures in the current trial of former Illinois Gov. Rod Blagojevich– it has been roundly criticized as being so vague as to make it impossible to know what sorts of actions are illegal. Skilling said it should be struck as unconstitutional.

To read full story click here.

Read Supreme Court Ruling