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Tag: interrogation

Judge Rips FBI for Failing to Record 6-Hour Interrogation of Terror Suspect

courtroomBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI interrogated an Everett terror suspect for six hours without recording the interaction.

That didn’t sit well with U.S. District Court Judge William G. Young, who criticized the FBI during a day-long evidentiary hearing Thursday, the Boston Herald reports. 

“It would have been a very good idea if all this had been recorded,” Young said. “A recording device that is reliable ought to be part of their kit.”

The suspect, David Daoud Wright, was charged with conspiring to provide material support to a terrorist organization for allegedly plotting to behead a conservative blogger with Boston terror suspect Usaamah Rahim.

FBI Boston Special Agent David George said the interrogation wan’t recorded because “We were in his living room. We weren’t in the right environment for it … We were not properly equipped,” noting that the bureau prohibits using cell phones to record interviews.

Attorney Questions FBI Interrogation of Final Holdout in Wildlife Refuge Occupation

David Fry

David Fry

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

David Fry, one of the final holdouts in the 41-day occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Oregon, was questioned by the FBI despite his court-appointed attorney objecting to an interrogation.

The Oregonian reports that Fry’s attorney Per C. Olson has asked for all communication between prosecutors and law enforcement involved in the arrest, detention and questioning of Fry.

Fry was one of the last holdouts to surrender to the FBI.

“It will be defendant’s contention that the government should not have taken unfair advantage of the trust defendant had placed in the agents in his vulnerable state of mind by interrogating him in disregard of his counsel’s invocations,” Olson wrote in a motion filed in U.S. District Court.

FBI Agents to Begin Recording Interrogations After Long Policy Against It

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Overturning an FBI policy that is as old as the bureau, the Justice Department is now requiring the FBI in most cases to make audio or video recordings while interrogating suspects in custody, the Arizona Republic reports.

Since the FBI’s creation in 1908, agents have been barred from making audio recordings of suspects without special permission.

“This policy establishes a presumption that the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) and the United States Marshals Service (USMS) will electronically record statements made by individuals in their custody,” says the memo from James M. Cole, deputy attorney general, to all federal prosecutors and criminal chiefs.

“This policy also encourages agents and prosecutors to consider electronic recording in investigative or other circumstances where the presumption does not apply,” such as in the questioning of witnesses.

Did FBI Agents Violate Rights of Boston Marathon Bombing Suspect During Aggressive Interrogation?

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI’s interrogation of Boston Marathon bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev violated his rights while he he lay in pain in a hospital bed immediately following his arrest, his defense lawyers argued in court documents Wednesday.

The Chicago Tribune reports that FBI agents ignored Tsarnaev’s 10 requests for a lawyer even though authorities determined further dangers to the public did not exist.

“The questioning continued for hours, in what was obviously an effort to extract as much incriminating information as possible, without regard for the protections of the Fifth Amendment,” his lawyers wrote in the 21-page filing.

Lawyers are asking for the hospital statements to be suppressed because he was heavily sedated and in a lot of pain during the interviews.

Tsarnaev, 20, is charged with killing three people and wounding more than 260 others with his brother, Tamerlan, who was killed during a manhunt for the duo.

Man Wearing Google Glass Faces Hour-Long Interrogation at Ohio Movie Theater

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

An Ohio man was interrogated for an hour after he was spotted wearing Goggle Glass at a movie theater.

The Business Insider reports that the glasses caused alarm at the AMC theater, where employees believed he was illegally taping the film.

The man, who has not been identified, tried telling authorities that the device was turned off and that the glasses were prescription. But authorities didn’t believe him and eventually sorted through the contents of the device.

“While we’re huge fans of technology and innovation, wearing a device that has the capability to record video is not appropriate at the movie theatre,” AMC wrote in a statement.

High-Ranking FBI Agent Makes ‘Comedy of Errors’ by Copyrighting Sensitive Records

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

A high-ranking FBI agent made a series of baffling mistakes.

For one, the agent filed a sensitive internal manual about secret interrogation practices with the Library of Congress, which means anyone with library card get access it without any redactions, Mother Jones reports.

While the manual sat in a public The ACLU had tried for years to get a copy of the manual and has only ever received a heavily redacted copy.

Turns out, the supervisory special agent wanted to get it copyrighted – even though government documents can’t be copyrighted.

“A document that has not been released does not even need a copyright,” says Steven Aftergood, a government secrecy expert at the Federation of American Scientists. “Who is going to plagiarize from it? Even if you wanted to, you couldn’t violate the copyright because you don’t have the document. It isn’t available.”

“The whole thing is a comedy of errors,” he adds. “It sounds like gross incompetence and ignorance.”

U.S. Citizen Says He Was Held by FBI For 4 Months, Endured Harsh Treatment in Africa

 
 Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A U.S. citizen claims in a lawsuit filed by the federal government that he was held for four months, endured harsh interrogation and was later released after it was discovered he had done nothing wrong, the Reason reports.

Amir Meshal is represented by he ACLU, which contends its client was unfairly mistreated.

The Justice Department said the case shouldn’t move forward because of national security concerns.

The ACLU, which is to appear in court today on the issue, wrote:

The American Civil Liberties Union will appear in court on Wednesday on behalf of a U.S. citizen who was illegally detained and mistreated by American officials in three east African countries in 2007. After fleeing unrest in Somalia, New Jersey resident Amir Meshal was arrested, secretly imprisoned in inhumane conditions, and harshly interrogated by FBI agents over 30 times before ultimately being released without charge four months later. …

In December 2006, Meshal was studying in Mogadishu when civil unrest broke out. He fled to neighboring Kenya, where he wandered in the forest for three weeks seeking shelter and assistance before being arrested. He was then repeatedly interrogated by FBI agents, who accused him of receiving training from al Qaeda, which Meshal denied. The American interrogators threatened him with torture and kept him from contacting a lawyer or his family.

Meshal was subsequently rendered to Somalia and then Ethiopia, where he was secretly imprisoned in filthy conditions with inadequate access to food, water, and toilets for more than three months, and again harshly interrogated by U.S. officials, who bore responsibility for his rendition and continued detention.

 

Father Launches Independent Investigation of Ibragim Todashev’s Death During FBI Probe

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

Abdulbaki Todashev raised a photo of his dead son during a news conference Tuesday and pledged to uncover the truth behind Ibragim Todashev’s death during an FBI interrogation, The Guardian reports.

Todashev hired two prominent civil rights attorneys in Florida to determine what prompted the death of his 27-year-old son, who was being questioned in May about his relationship with one of the Boston Marathon bombing suspects.

The Muslim advocacy group, Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR), said it hired experts to investigate the case.

“This case is about police accountability and justice,” Hassan Shibly, the group’s executive director, said. “I don’t think we want to live in a country where people get shot by federal agents in their own homes.”

The FBI continues to declined to comment on Ibragim Todashev’s death, saying it’s still the subject of an investigation.