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Tag: lynching

FBI to Investigate Hanging Death of Black Man in Mississippi

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is helping investigate the hanging death of a 54-year-old black man in Mississippi.

Local police in the small central Mississippi town of Port Gibson requested the bureau’s help to determine whether Otis Byrd was murdered or committed suicide.

Byrd was last seen on March 2 and was found Thursday hanging from a tree in the woods.

“We want to make sure it was not a racial hate crime,” Derrick Johnson, head of the state chapter of the NAACP, told the Los Angeles Times. “We cannot stand by in 2015 and watch a lynching, if in fact that’s what happened.”

The focus Thursday was on combing the scene for evidence.

“We seen a man who had a bedsheet tied around his neck,” Claiborne County Sheriff Marvin Lucas told CNN.

 

 

FBI Investigates 7-Decade-Old Lynching of 2 Black Couples in Georgia

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It was a brutal lynching even by Georgia’s standards.

On July 25, 1946, a white mob tied up a black couple in their 20s and shot them 60 times.

The notorious incident became known as the Moore’s Ford Bridge lynching.

No one has been prosecuted in the case.

But The Guardian reports that the FBI is investigating claims by civil rights activists that the people responsible for the notorious lynching are still alive.

The FBI is questioning people who civil rights activists say are connected to the killing.

One of the people investigated by the FBI was Charlie Peppers, an 86-year-old man who lives about 10 miles west of the lynching site.

“Back when all that happened, I didn’t even know where Moore’s Ford was,” Peppers said, adding that “the blacks are blaming people that didn’t even know what happened back then.”

Suicide or Lynching? FBI Joins Inquiry into Black Teen Found Hanging in North Carolina

Lennon Lacy

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com 

It was a disturbing discovery – a black teenage boy hanging from a swing set in a trailer park in North Carolina.

Was it a suicide or a lynching?

The state has determined that 17-year-old Lennon Lacy committed suicide in August.

But the New York Times reports that the FBI has agreed to join an inquiry after family members and the North Carolina chapter of the NAACP urged the bureau to intervene.

The formal request for the FBI’s involvement came from Thomas G. Walker, the U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of North Carolina.

Last week, a march was organized to show solidarity with Lacy.

“They have the resources and the mandate of law and the kind of specialized training to look at these facts on all sides,” the Rev. William J. Barber II, the president of the North Carolina N.A.A.C.P. and an organizer of Saturday’s march, said of the F.B.I.

The state has defended its handling of the investigation and said there was no evidence of a lynching.

Belated Honors for Federal Agent Lynched in Post-Reconstruction Mississippi

William Henderson Foote, photo ATF

Shoshanna Utchenik
ticklethewire.com

It took a while — a very long while.

The first African-American federal law enforcement officer to be killed in the line of duty after Reconstruction was in 1883. He was lynched by a bloodthirsty mob of 200 townspeople in Mississippi.

Now,   more than a century later, the life and service of William Henderson Foote is being celebrated.

The Washington Post tells the tragic story of William Henderson Foote, a “revenuer,” or deputy tax collector, with the Treasury’s Bureau of Internal Revenue, a predecessor to the ATF.

Though Foote’s agency at the time apparently did nothing to protect him from the lynch mob nor even acknowledge his death, the current ATF did unveil his name on its Memorial Wall during a celebration of his life Monday. As part of National Police Week, his name has also been unveiled on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial.

Foot was also a civil rights leader, state legislator and local constable. A few days before his murder on Christmas eve of 1883, “with total disregard for his own life, but carrying the inherent responsibility of someone who has been known as a man of the law,” he tried to stop a white “whipping party” intent on lynching a black man, reports the Washington Post, quoting ATF historian Barbara Osteika. A chaotic shoot-out occurred, resulting in the deaths of 3 white men, for which Foote and 10 other black men were arrested.

The white community was not satisfied with the justice system and took vengeance into its own hands, breaking into the prison with a battering ram and dragging Foote and the others to a brutal attack.

Last year, the ATF presented Foote’s great-niece Bettye Gardner with a Gold Star Medal to honor Foote, and great-granddaughter Mattie Patricia Nolcox received one this week.

As the memorial efforts of the ATF and National Police Week attest, it is never too late to heal the wounds of history.

To read more click here.

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