best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

December 2016
S M T W T F S
« Nov    
 123
45678910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Missouri

Department of Justice Reaches Agreement on Consent Decree with Ferguson

ferguson logoBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

An agreement was reached Wednesday between federal officials and leaders in Ferguson, Mo., to end unlawful arrests and excessive force.

The New York Times reports that the agreement still must be approved by the City Council after undergoing public scrutiny.

The pact comes in the aftermath of the fatal shooting of Michael Brown in 2014.

As a result of the consent decree, Ferguson would be spared an expensive, lengthy court battle.

The pact demonstrates the city’s “commitment to refocusing police and municipal court practices on public safety, rather than revenue generation,” Vanita Gupta, the department’s top civil rights prosecutor, said in a letter to Ferguson.

“It was a sweeping report and the settlement, too, is unusual in its breadth,” the New York Times reports. “It demands changes not only to how and when police officers use force, but to the city’s entire criminal justice system.”

Other Stories of Interest

FBI Passes Up Another Opportunity to Re-Open Civil Rights Cold Case

Lloyd Gaines/Wikipedia

Lloyd Gaines/Wikipedia

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Soon after winning a landmark legal battle to become the first black student in the University of Missouri’s law school, Lloyd Gaines vanished in 1939.

The FBI declined to investigate in 1940 and 1970.

Records obtained by the Associated Press show that the bureau again declined to investigate the case between 2006 and 2013, despite reviewing more than 100 others as part of the Department of Justice initiative and Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Act.

“They should have done more way back when,” said nephew George Gaines, a retiree who lives in San Diego. “I don’t believe there would have been much uncovered more recently. People die, memories fade, records are destroyed. And some people choose not to remember.”

In 1938, the Supreme Court ruled that Gaines, who grew up in St. Louis, must be allowed into the law school or the university must establish a separate law school for black people.

What happened to Gaines remains unclear. Some believe he was killed; others believe he moved to Mexico.

Other Stories of Interest

Missouri Lt. Gov. Kinder: DOJ Is More Racist Than St. Louis, Ferguson

Peter Kinder

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Missouri Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder said the Justice Department is “obsessed with race” and has demonstrated more racism than “than anywhere I see in the St. Louis area,” The Huffington Post reports.

Kinder claims protests over the death of Michael Brown are “based on a lie” and have been exacerbated by a Justice Department report that concluded Ferguson has systematically discriminated against black residents.

The problem, Kinder said, was that the Justice Department is staffed with “hard-left radical leftist lawyers.”

“There is more racism in the Justice Department than anywhere I see in the St. Louis area,” he said. “We’ve come an enormous way in 50 years, that’s not to say that we don’t have still more to do. It is the left, it is the Eric Holder and the Obama left and their minions that are obsessed with race while the rest of us are moving on beyond it.”

Justice Department Considering Suing Ferguson Over Racial Discrimination

Michael Brown

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The Justice Department is prepared to sue the city of Ferguson, Mo., if city leaders balk at revising discriminatory police tactics, The Dallas Morning News reports.

Attorney General Eric Holder is expected to reveal the findings from two separate federal investigations into the police shooting of a black 18-year-old, Michael Brown.

Federal investigators are trying to determine whether police violated anyone’s civil rights.

While it’s unlikely that feds will charge the officer who pulled the trigger, the Justice Department is expected to allege that police targeted minorities during traffic stops.

“I think everybody will see when we announce our results that the process that we have engaged in is, as I said back at the time when I went to Ferguson, independent, thorough and based on all the facts,” Holder said Tuesday. “And I am confident that people will be satisfied with the results that will be announced.”

2 FBI Agents Shot Near Unrest in Ferguson While Executing Search Warrant

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Two FBI agents were shot while helping police execute a search warrant near Ferguson early Wednesday, Reuters reports.

The FBI said the shooting was unrelated to the unrest in Ferguson, where protesters have been gathering for months after a white police officer shot an unarmed black teen.

“The incident is not directly related to the Ferguson protests,” FBI spokeswoman Rebecca Wu said.

One agent was shot in the leg and the other was shot in the shoulder.

The injuries are not life-threatening, the bureau said.

FBI Investigates Missouri Officer’s Use of Stun Gun After Teen Hospitalized in Critical Condition

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is investigating a Missouri police officer’s use of a stun gun to subdue a 17-year-old during a traffic stop.

The Associated Press reports that the stun gun left Bryce Masters in critical condition.

The incident happened in the suburban Kansas City community of Independence.

Police said the officer resorted to using stun gun because the teen was physically resisting.

The officer is on administrative leave pending an investigation.

Maters’ family was seeking a federal probe.

The FBI’s Kansas City field office is handling.

FBI Investigates Apparent Fire-Bombing Attempt of Congressman’s Office in Missouri

Rep. Emanuel Cleaver II/gov photo

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI is investigating what appears to be an attempted fire-bombing of the Kansas, Mo., offices of Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, the Los Angeles Times reports.

An intrusion alarm alerted police to the incident at 2:52 a.m. Thursday at the one-story building at 101 W. 31 St.

“Upon arrival, they observed a window on the northwest side of the building to be broken out. On the ground below the window, they observed two broken bottles with paper towels sticking out the necks of the bottles. There was a chemical odor resembling that of lighter fluid,” according to the city police.

A broken window appeared to be the only damage.

This wasn’t the first such attack.

“This is the second incident within the last six years,” John Jones, Cleaver’s chief of staff said in a prepared statement. “The Kansas City police have completed their initial survey of the scene and we await their report. None of the staff was in the building, and because Congress is in session, Congressman Cleaver is in Washington.”

The FBI said it is investigating.

“We have no arrests yet, but we are very early in the investigation,” FBI spokeswoman Bridget Patton told the Los Angeles Times said.

History Indicates Justice Department Will Have Challenge Landing Prosecution in Ferguson Shooting

Michael Brown

Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

What are the chances of the Justice Department landing a criminal prosecution in the police shooting of an unarmed black teenager in Ferguson?

It won’t be easy, the Associated Press reports.

Dozens of FBI agents are in Ferguson, interviewing potential witnesses.

The Justice Department must meet a difficult standard of proof. To prove their case, they need to convince a judge or jury that the officer acted not only with excessive force but willfully violated Michael Brown’s constitutional rights.

“It’s a very difficult standard to meet, and it really is satisfied only in the most egregious cases,” said University of Michigan law professor Samuel Bagenstos, the former No. 2 official in the department’s civil rights division. “Criminal enforcement of constitutional rights is not something that is easily pursued. It really requires building a case very carefully, very painstakingly.”

What still remains unclear is what was happening when the officer pulled the trigger.

'