best casino bonuses australian online casino au dollars trusted online gambling internet casino download old information online us casinos las vegas best online casino craps flash casino games mac play online vegas

Get Our Newsletter



Links

Columnists



Site Search


Entire (RSS)
Comments (RSS)

Archive Calendar

September 2017
S M T W T F S
« Aug    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930

Guides

How to Become a Bounty Hunter



Tag: Utah

Homeland Security Leader Accidentally Gave Out Sex Hotline Number

cell-phone-app-fbiBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A Homeland Security leader who was warming the public about dangers of sexual predators passed out business cards for his desk, but there was only one problem: The phone number directed people to a 24-hour sex talk line.

The Desert News reports that Steve Cagen, the new head of the investigative arm of Homeland Security’s Utah division, disseminated his business cards, which contained the wrong phone number.

When reporters called the number, they were greeted with a woman’s voice who said, “Hi, sexy” with sultry music in the background. The woman told callers that they had reached the “hottest fantasy line in North America” while offering “private erotic conversations.”

An ICE spokeswoman later acknowledged that the numbers on Cagen’s business card were wrong.

Other Stories of Interest

Utah Man Arrested for Soliciting Sex After Reporting Craigslist ‘Scam’

Nicholas Deelstra

Nicholas Deelstra

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

A state worker ended up in jail after reporting to the FBI that he was soliciting sex from a purported teen who never showed up at his house.

The Salt Lake Tribune reports that Nicholas Deelstra, 54, called the FBI in late August about an alleged Craigslist scam. 

An employee with the Office of Rehabilitation in the state Department of Workforce Services, Deelstra said someone claiming to be the teen’s father messaged him, “demanding he send money to cover car repairs because” the family’s vehicle was damaged while the boy was trying to meet with the man.

Logan City Police took up the case and arrested Deelstra last week for alleged sex crimes.

The Tribune wrote:

Deelstra told a Logan officer that he agreed to meet with the teen for sex, despite knowing he was underage, court records state. Police also found sexually explicit messages between Deelstra and the purported teen on the man’s phone.

Deelstra was charged Monday in 1st District Court with third-degree felony counts of sexual exploitation of a minor and dealing inmaterials harmful to a minor, as well as two counts of class Amisdemeanor soliciting a minor by internet or text.

Other Stories of Interest

Prosecutors Call on FBI to Help Investigate Violent Arrest of Nurse in Utah

Arrest of nurse Alex Wobbels caught on video.

Arrest of nurse Alex Wobbels caught on video.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has been asked to join a criminal investigation into the violent arrest of a local nurse who was trying to protect the constitutional rights of a patient in Utah.

District Attorney Sim Gill in Salt Lake City wants the FBI to help determine whether the arresting officer or anyone else on the police force violated the civil rights of the nurse, Alex Wobbels, whose July 26 arrest went viral, according to a letter made public Thursday

“We request an investigation in addition to any other criminal or other investigation of the matter,” Gill wrote in the letter. “In order to be thorough, and given the gravity of the rights potentially implicated, all issues must be completely examined to restore the public trust currently compromised by the actions depicted in the publicly released video recordings of the incident. It is essential that all individuals and institutions associated with this incident should be investigated to document the roles they played in the incident to prevent such a thing from happening again. Our community and its citizens deserve nothing less.”

The arrest was caught on a police body camera, prompting widespread outrage at Detective Jeff Payne’s handling of the nurse. The hospital also barred police from having contact with nurses.

FBI Arrests Suspect in Cruise Ship Death of 39-Year-Old Utah Woman

Emerald Princess, via Wikipedia.

Emerald Princess, via Wikipedia.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

The FBI has arrested a suspect in the cruise ship death of a 39-year-old Utah woman.

Time reports the suspect was taken into custody late Wednesday and is expected to be charged today in what federal authorities are calling a domestic dispute that led to the Tuesday night death of a woman aboard the Emerald Princess in U.S. waters off Alaska. 

At the time, the ship was carrying 3,400 passengers and 1,100 crew members during a weeklong trip that departed Seattle on Sunday.

Details of the death remain a mystery.

The FBI gets involved in deaths that occur in international or U.S. waters.

Federal Agents Seize Tens of Thousands of Fentanyl Pills In Huge Drug Bust in Utah

pillsBy Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It’s being billed as one of the largest drug busts in Utah history.

Federal agents seized tens of thousands of synthetic opioids – or fentanyl pills – and cash Tuesday at a home in Utah where a “pill press” was found, the Washington Post reports. 

The pills were falsely labeled as Xanax or oxycodone and shipped across the U.S.

The DEA, National Guard and IRS were involved in the raid at a home in the city of Cottonwood Heights in Salt Lake County.

“A very small amount ingested, or absorbed through your skin, can kill you,” warned Acting DEA Deputy Administrator Jack Riley in June.

Aaron Michael Shamo, 26, was charged with possession of fentanyl with intent to distribute.

Other Stories of Interest

Rep. Chaffetz Claims He Received Death Threats over Tweets about Clinton Probe

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah.

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah.

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, said he received death threats after tweeting about the FBI’s renewed interest in the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s use of private email servers.

Chaffetz, who is chairman of the powerful House Oversight and Government Reform committee, said he has increased his security, the Salt Lake Tribune reports. 

In one of the tweets, Chaffetz mischaracterized a letter from the FBI, saying the bureau had reopened the investigation, even though it had never been closed.

“Unfortunately, I have had some death threats,” Chaffetz said. “Most people want to express their opinions in very volatile situations but you get some people who are a little too aggressive and I’ve turned those over to the authorities to deal with.”

Chaffetz declined to discuss the specific threats.

SLT Editorial: DEA Should Not Bypass Judges Or Search Warrants

dea-badgeBy Editorial Board
The Salt Lake Tribune

If the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration says it can’t do its job without bypassing a judge’s signature, it raises reasonable suspicions about law enforcement operating without proper oversight.

If the DEA adds that such a bypass is needed to stop Utahns from overdosing at high rates, it exposes just how shameless the war on drugs has become.

In a move that raises the specter of indiscriminate NSA phone monitoring, the federal government’s drug cops are pushing back against a Utah law that took effect this year that requires a judge to sign a search warrant for access to the state’s data base of prescriptions. Before that law, law enforcement could simply use “administrative subpoenas” that required no signoff from a judge.

It is precisely because of the abuse of such subpoenas that Sen. Todd Weiler, R-Woods Cross, sponsored the Utah law. The prescription data base was created in 1995 to track the blossoming problem of prescription drug abuse, particularly pain medications, and police could access it without a formal warrant from a judge.

In a notorious case, Cottonwood Heights police searched through every prescription issued to 480 Unified Fire Authority employees after pills were found missing from ambulances. If that egregious violation of privacy wasn’t enough, prosecutors eventually filed faulty charges against one assistant fire chief based on the search. He was cleared, and he’s now suing Cottonwood Heights.

DEA’s spokeswoman says the state’s new requirement “will significantly hamper our mission,” but she didn’t elaborate on how. All the Utah law asks is that the DEA get a judge to sign a warrant before the data base can be searched. That is something that could take as little as a couple of hours in a process that most of law enforcement uses daily. It also adds a measure of legitimacy to any investigation, meaning that the eventual charges have a better chance of sticking.

To read more click here. 

FBI, Marshals Service Bestowed ‘Black Hole Award’ for Refusing to Disclose Records

By Steve Neavling
ticklethewire.com

It’s not an award to celebrate.

The Utah Headlines Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists bestowed the Black Hole Award to the U.S. Marshals Service and the FBI.

The Deseret News published a letter to the Attorney General from the journalist group.

The group explained that the agencies won the award for refusing to disclose any information about the April 21, 2014, shooting at a federal courthouse in Salt Lake City.

The shooting by a U.S. marshal killed defendant Siale Angilau, and the case was investigated by the FBI.

“Those few facts and that the Department of Justice elected not to prosecute the marshal comprise what we know,” the group wrote. “No one at the Marshals Service or the FBI will answer more questions. The Marshals Service has denied multiple requests made for documents under the Freedom of Information Act. A request to the FBI has been pending for a year.”